Take stock

Taking Stock

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It is good, as a writer, every now and then, to pause in the relentless angling for words. To take stock, inventory. To take a deep breath and look around at your stuff. I sometimes like to do this, to letup and ask myself: what am I working on? What should I be working on? What could I be working on? 

I recently took a week and half break from my writing. It was a wonderful 10 days of recharging my writing batteries. 

I was one of 9 lucky writers to spend a three-day weekend with Jane Yolen and her daughter, Heidi, at their home in Massachusetts. It was the first time Jane and Heidi offered a Picture Book Boot Camp. Jane shared her treasure trove of wisdom from years in the writing business. I can’t include all of the wonderful things she said, but here are a few “Jane’isms:”Image

“Turn off the internal editor…give yourself permission to write badly.” “A manuscript in a drawer doesn’t sell.” “Work on a variety of projects cause if you’re blocked on one, move to another…” “The eye and the ear are different listeners…read your work aloud…have someone else read it aloud.” “Picture books should have lyricism, sing-a-bility.” “The best motion in a picture book is turning the page.” “Make up words, stretch the language, find the right word.”

I drove away from Jane and friends bubbling over with inspiration and new directions. On the heels of the PBBC, I shuffled off to Boyds Mills, PA, to co-teach at the Highlights Writing for Science retreat. Working alongside host, Andy Boyles, and two gifted writers, Loree Griffin Burns and Gail Jarrow, we helped guide and hone our conferees’ science manuscripts. How great was it to view these stories in the raw, to know with hard work that the rough drafts could become complete and polished manuscripts ready for submission. Here are a few writing tips from the science writing workshop:Image

“”The job of the 1st paragraph is to get the reader to the 2nd paragraph” (Jerry Spinelli); “Always ask the question – why does it matter if this book is available to kids.” “The structure for your nonfiction proposal should be logical.” “A good magazine query is short and to the point (about 250 words).”  “When writing about science, look for real people who are solving or attempting to solve real problems.” “Scientists are passionate about their work – get that passion onto the page.”

This mini-escape was the perfect breather for me. It felt good to take stock, to talk business, and like Humpty Dumpty, to pull apart manuscripts and put them back together again. Now that I’ve stretched, catalogued and fine-tuned, it’s time to hit the refresh button.Image

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One response to “Take stock

  1. Pingback: Faculty members are writers, too | Workshops for Children's Authors & Illustrators | Highlights Foundation

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